Health provision in Uganda is shared between government-funded facilities (typically large hospitals), private not-for-profit facilities which include church-supported hospitals, medium-sized clinics, private for-profit or commercial health units and self-employed physicians. The share is 30% government (Ministry of Health), 45% not-for-profit (NGOs) and 25% for-profit (private). The distribution of services tends to mean rural areas are underserved and lower-income households in urban areas are underserved as for-profit outlets and crowded government hospitals are concentrated in the towns. IHK has responded to this imbalance by encouraging companies in Kampala to sponsor a ward of beds to enable subsidised care of serious cases among lower-income households.
A separate, independent philanthropic not-for-profit NGO, Hope Clinic Lukuli, has been working for six years to minimise the financial barriers to health information and treatment among the Kampala population in Makindye Division. As a general practice facility it assists in maternal care, malaria management and childhood diseases as well as providing HIV counseling, testing, care and support services.

In Uganda, as in many African countries, English, the language of the colonizing power, was introduced in government and public life by way of missionary work and the educational

Now that Stephen Kiprotich has become only the second person in history to win gold in the marathon at the Olympics and World Championships, he could as well have assumed first position on the list of Uganda's greatest sports personalities, writes David Lumu.
When Stephen Kiprotich crossed the finishing line in Moscow, to comfortably win by 21 seconds from Ethiopian Lelisa Desisa, it seemed as though the 24-year-old had barely broken a sweat. He looked so fresh, as if he could have maintained the finishing pace for another 10 kilometres.
Most importantly, he erased the slightest doubts about his greatness and his legacy will forever be defined for winning the two most important marathon races in the world of athletics. Before winning gold at the 2012 London Olympics, most Ugandans - even those in sports circles - barely knew him because he hadn't won anything significant before.
The hopes for an Olympic medal lay solely on the shoulders of Moses Kipsiro. So, a few pessimists equated Kiprotich's Olympic glory win to a flash in the pan. They reminded optimists of the young Boniface Kiprop, who had wowed the world as a junior before vanishing into virtual oblivion.

Not only is the marathon the most enduring discipline in athletics, it is also the most

In terms of achievement, he has surpassed everyone - including the legendary John Akii-Bua - who won Olympic gold in the 400m hurdles in 1972. What makes Akii-Bua stand out is that he did it in world record fashion and chances are high he would have repeated the feat in 1976 had Uganda not joined the rest of Africa in boycotting the Montreal Olympics.
Besides, the world championships started in 1983 long after Akii-Bua had retired. However, Akii-Bua barely made his mark at the Commonwealth Games and it could be argued that his peak lasted for just a year. Which is somehow surprising that Kiprotich has also achieved these feats in just one year.
And who knows what the future holds as he continues to mature?
He may not have broken or even come close to Patrick Makau's 2:03:38 record but he didn't need to because, just like the Olympics, there are no pace-setters at the World Championships. Only the crème de la crème.
However, given the fact that each country, irrespective of ranking, is only allowed to enter five athletes for the marathon, it would most likely have been a different story for Kiprotich had he been against a contingent of Kenyans. But for now, what matters is that he passed the two biggest tests in athletics and any more victories will only serve to cement his position as the greatest of all time.

Now that Stephen Kiprotich has become only the second person in history to win gold in the marathon at the Olympics and World Championships, he could as well have assumed first position on the list of Uganda's greatest sports personalities, writes David Lumu.
When Stephen Kiprotich crossed the finishing line in Moscow, to comfortably win by 21 seconds from Ethiopian Lelisa Desisa, it seemed as though the 24-year-old had barely broken a sweat. He looked so fresh, as if he could have maintained the finishing pace for another 10 kilometres.
Most importantly, he erased the slightest doubts about his greatness and his legacy will forever be defined for winning the two most important marathon races in the world of athletics. Before winning gold at the 2012 London Olympics, most Ugandans - even those in sports circles - barely knew him because he hadn't won anything significant before.
The hopes for an Olympic medal lay solely on the shoulders of Moses Kipsiro. So, a few pessimists equated Kiprotich's Olympic glory win to a flash in the pan. They reminded optimists of the young Boniface Kiprop, who had wowed the world as a junior before vanishing into virtual oblivion.
Not only is the marathon the most enduring discipline in athletics, it is also the most unpredictable. That's why Kiprotich's victory on Saturday ranks among the greatest in

Typically, republics and kingdoms aren’t compatible and don’t coexist homewever, there are some notable examples around the world that are the exceptions proving the rule.
Some of the better known kingdoms that are part of a republic are those that are within the Republic of Uganda. The kingdoms of Buganda, Bunyoro-Kitara, Busoga and Toro are ancient traditional kingdoms of Africa that long enjoyed local and international recognition, even by the British colonial powers.
Unfortunately, with the political upheavel that Uganda experienced in the late 1960′s the new government of Milton Obote forcefully disbanded all the traditional kingdoms. The constitution introduced in 1967 went a step further and fully outlawed them.
The famously violent regime of Idi Amin of the 1970′s was no better and it wasn’t until the democratically elected government of 1993 re-established them. Then in 1995, the new constitution fully recognized these ancient kingdoms in law and the powers of their leaders or Kings. The 2005 amendment to the constitution re-affirmed the position of these Kings, further confirming their status in Ugandan society.

Though these Kingdoms are fully recognized in law, they are not fully sovereign politically. However, they do have considerable political influence and regularly meet with government.

Typically, republics and kingdoms aren’t compatible and don’t coexist homewever, there are some notable examples around the world that are the exceptions proving the rule.
Some of the better known kingdoms that are part of a republic are those that are within the Republic of Uganda. The kingdoms of Buganda, Bunyoro-Kitara, Busoga and Toro are ancient traditional kingdoms of Africa that long enjoyed local and international recognition, even by the British colonial powers.
Unfortunately, with the political upheavel that Uganda experienced in the late 1960′s the new government of Milton Obote forcefully disbanded all the traditional kingdoms. The constitution introduced in 1967 went a step further and fully outlawed them.
The famously violent regime of Idi Amin of the 1970′s was no better and it wasn’t until the democratically elected government of 1993 re-established them. Then in 1995, the new constitution fully recognized these ancient kingdoms in law and the powers of their leaders or Kings. The 2005 amendment to the constitution re-affirmed the position of these Kings, further confirming their status in Ugandan society.
Though these Kingdoms are fully recognized in law, they are not fully sovereign politically. However, they do have considerable political influence and regularly meet with government leaders.

papyrus plants was firm and dry. The destruction of the wetland was carried out so a rose farm owned by a fabulously wealthy businessman could be expanded.
The area on Lake Victoria's Lutembe Bay was deemed to be of international importance under an international convention on wetlands but, asked by activists to intervene, Uganda's environmental protection agency instead sided with industry, saying any damage inflicted upon the wetland didn't match the economic benefits of exporting more flowers.
The authorized encroachment on Uganda's Lutembe Bay wetland, a site that protects Lake Victoria's fragile ecosystem, highlights a growing conflict between business and the environment as African countries strive for economic development. Although Africa's endangered forests have attracted a lot more attention from campaigners, some experts say wetlands across the continent are suffering a similar —if not worse —fate, often because their value to human wellbeing is underestimated or not understood at all.
In the Ugandan case, the business decimating a wetland is owned by Ugandan tycoon Sudhir Ruparelia, who, according to Forbes magazine, is the richest man in East Africa and one of Africa's wealthiest people. He is widely believed to be close to Uganda's political elite, circumstances that have contributed to concerns that his expansion project was approved under dubious circumstances.